Top View 29.53 ft.
An installation in public space
by Nevin Aladag and Beate Engl
2012 Rindermarkt, Munich
2013 Villa Merkel, Esslingen

Material: concrete weights, scaffolding, traverse, steel and aluminum pipes, galvanized wire-mesh fence, wire, canvas, LED-screen, stereo speakers, HD video

scaffold sculpture: Beate Engl
measurements : 9 x 8 x 6 m
LED-screen: 4,5 x 2,5 m
video: Nevin Aladag
duration: 2:48 min, Loop



Beate Engl
Beate Engl
Out of their own individual artistic strategies, Nevin Aladag and Beate Engl have developed their collaborative multimedia project Top View 29.53 ft. for a public place in Munich, a work that includes both participatory elements and a concrete dialogue with the location.
Inspired by the huge advertising billboards often found on the major arteries and building roofs of international metropolises, Engl designed a framework approximately nine meters tall for a display featuring a video work by Nevin Aladag. The framework’s shape derives not just from technical or site-specific factors, but asserts itself as an autonomous sculpture in the urban environment. Many parts of the skeleton have no structural significance; they project as chaotic elements from the otherwise compact form. The intentionally improvised appearance of the temporary construction evokes associations not only of overburdened architects, but also of the failure of utopian architectural projects such as Tatlin’s Monument to the Third International
.

For the video, Nevin Aladag approached people of different ages, ethnicities, sexes, and social classes in the center of Munich and asked them to perform a few dance steps for the camera. Although the people in the film remain anonymous, and one sees little more than their shoes and the movements of their feet, even these tell a lot about people’s identities. Aladag composed some fifty of the filmed sequences into a loop whose sound is made up of heels clicking and soles scraping on the pavement of Munich’s sidewalks and squares. The film is projected on an LED display like the ones typically used in mass advertising. The work’s title, Top View 29.53 ft., refers to the framework’s actual height and also alludes, with the English unit of measurement, to the feet that are visible on the display.

The artists consciously chose the Rindermarkt, whose terraced fountain already offers a kind of grandstand situation, as the place to set up their collaborative multimedia project. “We looked for a place that had an urban structure, but was also a place where people hang out,” Engl explains. On this busy square, the dancers’ rhythms interweave with the ambient city sounds in a summery sonic tapestry.

(from the press text by Cornelia Gockel)